Tag Archives: Bradley/Taggart

Four Hour Couloir – Shadow Peak

Location: GTNP, Shadow Peak, Avalanche Canyon
Elevation: 9,886′, 3,456′ gain/loss
Distance: 8 miles RT
Difficulty: 3 stars
Time: 4-6 hours

Trip Report:

Date: 1/11/2016
Snow Conditions: Powder, sun crust 5″ down, loose sluff, frozen debris piles

Having made plans with Tyler to ski a quick lap in Grand Teton National Park on Monday a few days before, I slowly got out of bed and began to get ready.  I was tired from the past two days (The Nugget, West Hourglass), but figured what’s one more schuss!  Based on the conditions in the West Hourglass Sunday, I was hopeful the Four Hour Couloir would ski well.  The wind had been coming from the West/Northwest for about two days and the temperature has stayed low, so a South-facing line seemed to make sense.  With these thoughts in mind, we took off from the trailhead at 8:20am.  We made easy work of the up and were at base of the couloir in 2hrs 30min.

(For a more detailed description of the route, etc take a look at an older post – 4 Hour Couloir.)

We geared up, took a look at the couloir and decided it was good to go.  There was a noticeable sun crust about 5″ below soft powder, but the couloir looked to have flushed a few times recently.  Down lower, the snow was soft and fluffy.  We milked the last 800′ of powder all the way to the track out of Avalanche Canyon on the south side (which is in and crossed the creek).  We cruised back to the truck at 3hrs 59min, happy with the quick lap and decent snow.

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Southern aspect of Teewinot

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Buck and Wister rising above the clouds

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Keep on Adventuring!

West Hourglass – Nez Perce

Location: GTNP, Garnett Canyon, Nez Perce
Elevation: 11,280′, 5,120′ gain/loss
Distance: 15 miles RT
Difficulty: 3+ stars
Time: 7-9 hours

Trip Report:

Date: 1/10/2016
Snow Conditions: Wind crust, caulk, powder, faceted snow, boilerplate crust, breakable wind crust

A day after heading up Garnett Canyon to ski The Nugget, I once again was skinning up the canyon for a schuss.  Dane, Zelie, Lexie and I had decided to take a look at West Hourglass off Nez Perce.  I have skied it a couple times, but was hopeful that the conditions would be better than past skis.  It seems to get a lot of wind based on its location in Garnett and is typically wind scoured, but based on the day before, I thought we had a shot for couloir powder.

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We left Bradley/Taggart at 8:30am and within no time we were in the Meadows where we came upon a group of two skiing down towards us.  They stopped and chatted for a second, saying they bailed on the West Hourglass because of 6″ windslabs and a crust on the lower apron of the run.  We took what they said with a grain of salt and decided to have a look for ourselves.  They beauty of Garnett is that there is always another line you can ski if you decide to bail on your first objective.

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As we worked our way up to the apron of the Hourglasses, we didn’t see the slabs they were talking about, but did notice a pretty solid wind crust.  We decided to continue up and assess the situation as we progressed.  Here, the skinning wasn’t too bad besides a few buff spots and we were at the base of the Hourglasses fairly quickly.

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East Hourglass looking skiable!

At the base of the West Hourglass, we took our skins off and stashed them near a rock.  When doing this, I lost control of Dane’s rolled skins and they went careening down the apron and out of sight-Oops!  We later found them, but it was a reminder that you never can be too careful with your gear in the mountains.  With that behind us, we started up the initial first pitch.  I would guess it reaches 45 degrees and has a fairly large rollover at the top.  We knew this would be the most dangerous part of the climb and stayed close to each other near the lookers left wall.

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On the up at the first pitch of the couloir

About 100′ from the top of the pitch, Dane tapped out below a safe spot and I continued on solo over the rollover.  It was hard going, but I made it up and over into a safe zone.  The others continued up to me as the wind began to howl, moving snow down the couloir and into the void.

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After the group reached my spot, we all took a look up the couloir and saw it was not in great shape.  There was numerous wind ripples in the snow and what appeared to be bulletproof snow throughout much of the middle section.  Regardless, we continued on to the top.  The going was fairly easy, with only the upper section holding deepish snow.

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Nearing the top

We stopped about 200′ from the true top of the couloir, because it looked to be unskiable at this point in the year.  We took our time getting ready, snapping a few pictures and eventually were ready for some old fashioned survival skiing!

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Having a look at the Grand

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Zelie, with the top 200′ looking rough

The skiing down wasn’t as bad as I had thought.  In spots is was a little unpredictable, but the wind ripples were soft and the firm snow wasn’t awful.  We made our way down to rollover with anticipation of powder turns and velvet snow…

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Lexie navigating the upper/middle section

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Looking down the middle portion to the rollover

We gathered at the rollover and decided I’d ski it halfway down and then the rest of the group take it down to the gear stash.  While we were not too concerned about the snow moving, this would have been the spot to go if it decided to.  It was very stable and pretty deep on the skiers right side of the pitch-which more than made up for the rest of the lines subpar snow.

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Jumping into the rollover

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Slash…

We gathered our gear and made our way down the apron, making a pit stop to grab Dane’s skins which had stopped about 500′ down the slope.  The skiing here was at times great and others terrifying.  The wind crust was inconsistent and very grabby in places.  We all made it down safe, but there were a few dicy turns that kept us on edge.

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After regrouping in the Meadows, we cruised out of the canyon and made our way back to Bradley Lake.  The snow was decent on the last pitch above the lake, but still a little thin and slightly grabby.  We cruised across the lake and eventually to the truck in 7hrs.  While the snow wasn’t the best, it was still great to get into the park on a double date–who needs dinner and a movie!?  Keep on Adventuring.

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The Nugget

Location: GTNP, Avalanche Canyon, Nez Perce/Cloudveil Dome
Elevation: 11,493′, 5,656′ gain/loss
Distance: 16 miles RT
Difficulty: 4 stars
Time: 7-9 hours

Trip Report:

Date: 1/9/2016
Snow Conditions: Powder, caulk, loose sluff, sun/wind crust 12″ below snow

With some light snow falling over the past couple days and a little more forecasted for Saturday: Dane, Tristan and I set out for a line we have been talking about for a couple years.  The Nugget Couloir, or just simply the Nugget is a technical ski line on the southern wall of Avalanche Canyon.  It terminates at a huge “chokestone” that can only be surpassed via rappel, or a 60′ air (which I don’t believe has happened).

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With the objective set and snow flurrying, we set out from Bradley/Taggart at 6:40am.  It was fairly warm to start out and we were quickly shedding some layers on the way to Bradley Lake.  We crossed the lake (which has an ice depth of 5″) as twilight began to take affect on the morning.

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We made quick work of the first few thousand feet up Garnett, only having a few issues with the track on some steep sections.  As we approached the Caves in Garnett Canyon, we were greeted with an arctic chill.  The wind was whipping around the canyon with a ferocity that I can’t recall in the past.  We put our layers on, but we were a little sweaty from the warm walk up so it didn’t do much good.  Regardless, we trudged on through the Meadows and into the South Fork of Garnett.

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We made our way past the apron of the Hourglass’, which was looking a little thin, and continued up above the steep section of the South Fork that is a mini waterfall in the summer.  Here we noticed some cracking in the newly deposited snow, but there was no movement, so we continued on.

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Approaching the “waterfall”

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Trist, trying not to get slid

From here, we worked our way up the canyon in the direction you would to climb the South or Middle Teton in the summer.  After gaining the bench at about 10,500′, we started working our way left towards the col between Nez Perce and Cloudveil Dome.  That is the start of the line, but we had a ways to go until we were skiing….

Col Photo

We worked our way up and into the couloir that ended at the col we were headed for.  The snow was soft and deep here and we were a little concerned about skinning to the top, so we switched over to bootpack mode for the remainder of the climb.  It did get fairly steep towards the top and while we were on the lookout for snow activity, we didn’t see any.  We topped out at 5hrs, into intermittent sun and a lashing wind.

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We quickly got geared up in harnesses and all our warm clothing in the howling wind and had a look at the line.  It looked a little thin up top, but lower down it looked to be holding some goods, so we had a quick talk about how to ski the top section and had a rip.

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Looking into Nugget from the top

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First few turn on the Nugget

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Looking down the second half of the upper portion

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Skiing the bottom half of the upper portion-we cut left towards the narrow section at the rock 500′ down on the left. (Visible in photo)

While we were on high alert for movement, we only saw some small wind slabs and loose sluff here.  We made our way down the first pitch, dodging a few rocks here and there, eventually traversing left to the tight middle section.  Here, we were a little concerned because there was a large hanging snow field above the tight section.  We decided on a few safe ski cuts, but we could not mitigate the skiers left side of the bowl.  We assumed that the snow would move, but mainly low energy slabs.  I skied down into the bowl and stopped below some rocks, only kicking off one small wind slab.  Dane and Trist stomped around near some rocks and finally were able to get something to move that ran down into the narrow section.  This made us feel a little better and decided that dane and Trist should ski down the path of the small “slabalanche”.

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Tristan above the snowfield that lead to the narrow section.

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While we were a little tentative, these turns were top notch! We made our way down into the narrow section and decided on how to proceed.  It looked like there was some constriction/bulge halfway down, so we decided to ski down to that and have a look.

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Two turds in a pod!

From here, Tristan skied down to the bulge and found a way through on the right.  He made his way down for a little bit after and pulled off and waited for us to make our way through the constriction.

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Dane skiing below the bulge

After this, we knew it was powder skiing all the way to the rappel.  It stayed a little tight for 500′, then opened up to the huge snowfield above the chockstone.  We skied it in several sections, milking the turns and enjoying the exposure that was below us.

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Near the end of the run and the 60′ drop, we grouped up and talked about how we wanted to approach the rappel.  We had heard that the anchor was on the skiers right of the rock, but couldn’t be sure.  Since I had the rope, I gingerly skied down to the rock and looked right.  After a little while, I saw a cord that I assumed was the anchor.  I quickly cut across an open slope and came upon the anchor about 30′ from the chockstone.

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Skiing down to the anchor, with Tristan watching over

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Top portion of the anchor

I clipped into the anchor and dug around a bit for the end while the others skied down.  I went down 3′ and only found what looked to be the carabiners to rappel off, but there was another cord running from that into the snow.  While we couldn’t be sure, we figured it was anchored to the wall as a backup.  We felt good about it and threw out our 70m rope and rappelled off down into the unknown.  We assumed that the rope would reach, but you never know. Thankfully there was about 20′ of rope to spare (I’d bring a 70m if possible, but a 60m would probably work) and we all made it down without issue.

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We were pumped!  This had been a line on our minds for years and we finally skied it, in POW no less.  We ate some much needed food and then skied down to the traverse out of Avalanche Canyon-still finding some solid powder down low.

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We pulled into the trailhead at 8hrs 15min, tired and happy.  It was a great day and one I won’t forget for a while…!

Southwest – Teewinot Mountain

Location: GTNP, Teewinot Mountain, Glacier Gulch
Elevation, Gain/Loss: 11,500’, 5,300’ gain/loss
Distance: 14 miles RT
Difficulty: 4 stars
Time: 7-10 hours

Trip Report:

Date: 1/03/2016
Snow Condition: Hard-packed wind crust, packed powder, breakable sun and wind crust, soft powder to sugar below 7,500 feet.

Stu, Tristan and I decided to head out on Sunday for a tour into the high country of Grand Teton National Park. We had a few things in mind that we felt would be fun skiing and within reason, but we didn’t really finalize the objective until we reached the parking lot at around 7 am Sunday morning. Having just skied the Red Sentinel the day before with Lexie, I felt that the south-facing aspects would hold some of the better snow. There was a decent wind event that came through the area early in the weekend that ended up creating some tough wind packed snow conditions on most aspects, especially the northern ones. Upon dropping into Glacier Gulch on Saturday, I noticed that there were two tracks down the South Couloir off of Teewinot. They looked pretty good and this is a line that I have been eyeing for a long time. With this in mind-and a pretty good photo of the line, our objective was set and we were off.

The south aspect of Teewinot from the bottom of the Red Sentinel
The south aspect of Teewinot from the bottom of the Red Sentinel

We made okay time getting up to Delta Lake, which has one of the more beautiful views in the park. Climbing up the moraine, we continued to gain elevation. There was a light cloud cover and a consistent breeze, which helped with the warming.

Up the moraine with the Grand looming overhead
Up the moraine with the Grand looming overhead

On the up
On the up

After switching over to booting shortly after the photo above, we had a decision to make. The bootpack set by the two who skied the South Couloir the day before went up and to the left.  We knew we had to go right in order to make it across the lower snowfield below the South Couloir. After following the boot pack a bit we realized that setting our own would cost us too much time and we felt that these guys would eventually go right up around the next rock band. Turned out the bootpack we were following didn’t go right and we were too high to make it onto the snowfield/into the South Couloir. So we continued up, setting our own booter up the SW Couloir, onto the shoulder of Teewinot.

Booting up the SW
Booting up the SW

Looking down the SW towards the valley floor
Looking down the SW towards the valley floor

Topping out on the shoulder
Topping out on the shoulder

It was getting late when we topped out of the SW Couloir and felt we didn’t have enough daylight to chase down the upper entrance to the South Couloir.  We decided to ski what we climbed–the SW Couloir to the snowfield below the South Couloir and then ski the two exit couloirs back down to Delta Lake. So that’s what we did. And it was great! Decent snow, somewhat technical steep hardpack snow, to some breakable crust, down to some soft powdery snow below 7,500 feet. Great skiing all around and another fun day out in the mountains.

Skiing off the shoulder
Skiing off the shoulder

Upper portion of the SW
Stu in the upper portion of the SW

Tristan right before to traversed left
Tristan right before we traversed left

Middle snowfields
Middle snowfields

Middle section
Middle section

Stu making it look good
Stu making it look good

The bottom exit coulior
The bottom exit coulior

Making it across Delta Lake
Making it across Delta Lake

Turkey Chute – 25 Short

Location: GTNP, 25 Short, Bradley/Taggart Trailhead, Avalanche Canyon

Elevation, gain/loss: 9960, 3625’ gain/loss
Distance: 10.5 miles RT
Difficulty: 2+ stars
Time:  4-6hrs

Trip Report:

Date: 12/28/2015
Snow Conditions: Powder, Packed Powder, Consolidated Powder

After a successful trip up the Sliver Couloir the day before, Tristan and I decided to head into the park Monday to take a look at Turkey Chute off 25 Short.  We had seen two tracks in the line the day before and a track out of Avalanche Canyon-across Taggart Lake.  With this in mind, we knew there was a good chance we could tackle this objective with relative ease.  We left the Bradley/Taggart Trailhead at 8:45am and made quick time up to the skiers summit of 25 Short (for full details on the route up, look at a previous post).

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We looked around at all the ski lines in Avalanche Canyon for a bit, making mental notes on all the routes that looked good to go.  There are at least 4 lines in this zone that I have been looking at for a couple years and hopefully this will be the year for a few of them.

We then worked our way over to the entrance of Turkey Chute, making sure to not pass it (directly South of the true 25 Short summit).  We took a little time transitioning over to ski mode and scrambled down into the chute.

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Looking at the entrance of Turkey Chute from the South.

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Looking down the line from the entrance.

Once in the line, we dug a few hand pits and didn’t see anything of concern.  We decided to ski the upper portion of the line in one stretch and then have some fun in the lower section.  The snow was very good: deep, supportive, stable and fluffy.  We milked the turns all the way down, letting the skis run towards the bottom, keeping an eye out for hidden rocks.

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Trist giving the thumbs up after digging his pit.

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After making it down safely, we made some fun turns to the canyon floor and began the traverse out of Avalanche Canyon.  It wasn’t that bad, considering how awful it can be and only took us 30minutes to Taggart Lake.  We decided to skin from here and made our way across the lake.  It was in great shape, completely frozen and quick to cross.

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We made it back to the truck in 4hr 26min, already thinking about the next objective.  All in all, Turkey Chute is a great early adventure or introduction to GTNP backcountry skiing.  We were pleased with the day and great conditions!

Turkey Chute
GPS

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